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The cardinal sin of coordination software - the thing that makes everyone hate JIRA or Asana or what have you - is mistaking the tool for the process.

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@owen "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure." is Goodhart's Law.

So, what do you say about a tool _for measuring_, in that case?

@mhoye My employer's annual performance planning doc is called a V2MOM. Values, Vision, Methods, Obstacles, and Measures. It is heavily schematized and tool-ified; I am currently receiving a steady stream of pointed robomails because I haven't done one this year.

I have some rather strong opinions about Goodhart's law as a result.

But the same opinions are shared by experiences like "can we get our JIRA time-to-close below X?" too, so.

@mhoye The trouble is, you really can't manage without measuring some things, but if you manage the things you're measuring, that outcome.

@mhoye I think about jwz.org/doc/groupware.html a lot for similar reasons. I think Jamie got the thesis right - that coordination software is for bureaucrats - 2005-Jamie also had a naif's perspective on why bureaucracy exists and what kinds of organizations require what kinds of coordination. 2017-Jamie's regret reflects this.

Coordinating tens, hundreds, or thousands of people can't be done on a wish and good intentions, but at the same time, schematization can strangle.

@owen @mhoye corollary: goals that can only be achieved by thousands of people are therefore systems for buying desired outcomes with the coin of employee burnout via schematization strangulation, and the question then becomes whether that is acceptable.

In the case of the federal public service? Hmm. Maybe, if there are provisions for recognizing early burnout and transitioning people to new careers preventatively. Maybe.

In the case of private businesses? Hm.

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